Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Dialogic Reading Method - Involve Your Preschooler in his Learning

A child’s experience with books is crucial when it comes to school readiness.  Reading provides a child with many necessary skills:
  • Vocabulary
  • Sound Structure
  • Meaning of print
  • Structure of stories and language
  • Sustained attention
  • Enjoyment of learning
How you read to your preschooler is just as important as reading often and from an early age.  Children learn from books when they are actively involved.  In The Dialogic Reading Method, the adult helps the child become the storyteller.  The fundamental technique involves choosing a book together, looking through it, the adult reading it and doing most of the talking, and pointing out names of things.

On the second reading, do the following:

Comment and wait - Comment on an object or ask a question of the child, and wait for their answer. Children need time to think and put their thoughts into language.

Ask questions and wait - Point to an object in the book and ask, "What's this?" or another appropriate question.  Avoid questions that can be answered with a simple "yes" or "no".
   
Respond by adding a little more - Repeat what your child says and then expand with one or two more words.  For example, if the child says “elephant”, the adult adds, “elephant, grey elephant”.  This reinforces the child’s words and provides new information.

Dialogic reading is simply children and adults having a conversation about a book.  You probably already do this but have never thought about it before.  Preschoolers will enjoy dialogic reading more than traditional reading as long as you alternate your questions with straight reading.  Vary what you do from book to book, and follow the child's interests.  Keep it fun!

Dialogic Reading is a method developed by The Stony Brook Reading and Language Project


Monday, May 18, 2015

Summer Reading 2015 Has Begun! - May 17 to August 10

Even if your child hasn't started preschool yet, a good way to encourage him to look at books over the summer is through participation in our summer reading program. Summer readers of all ages get started by:

  • Picking up a reading log in person at the Main Library or Rakow Branch or
  • Printing a log at home at www.gailborden.info/Read2015
  • Students at District U-46 schools will receive their logs at school in May

Reading = Prizes!


Baby & Me (Birth - 23 Months)
Reading Together (2 Years - K)
Readers (Grades 1 - 5)
Zone (Grades 6 - 8)
High School Teens
Adults


Take a look at our fun summer reading video featuring members of our local community!


Monday, May 11, 2015

Getting the Most Out of Picture Books


Picture books blend stories with art.  The illustrations are as important as the text, and both work together to tell the story.  A child's first impression of a book is usually determined by the pictures.
Some important points to remember:

  • When you read a picture book with your preschooler, pay attention to the illustrations as well.  Look for books with interesting, eye-catching illustrations to grab his attention.  
  • Look through the pages before you even begin reading.  That way, the illustrations will draw in even the most reluctant reader and help them develop a life-long love of reading.  Discuss what you see.
  • Illustrations convey meaning and carry information.  A story about a trip to a zoo or to the moon may have illustrations that will teach your child a lot about these places.    
  • Picture books help young children understand that words convey meaning, well before they are aware of the text.  
  • They can increase a child's vocabulary.  They can help children identify colors, shapes, numbers, and letters, as well as names of people, places, animals, and everyday objects. Choose books with clear or realistic pictures so that kids can point to objects and learn names.

Great picture books are everywhere!  If you'd like to receive our bi-weekly reading suggestion for preschoolers via email, click on the following link -   Book Lists - Reading Together, or stop by the desk in the Early Learning Center for more suggestions.  

Adapted from an article at Get Ready to Read



Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Reading Tips For Parents

A child's success as a reader begins much earlier than the first day of school. Reading, and a love for reading, begins at home. Reading Rockets' one-page parent tips offer easy ways for parents to help kids become successful readers. Although the tips are divided by age, many of them can be used with children at various ages and stages — you are encouraged to choose the ones that work best for your child.

To access tips on reading success in 11 languages and also for children with special needs, click on the following link: 

Reading Tips for Parents from Reading Rockets



Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Storytime Programs - Spring 2015, Week Seven

This is the last week of spring storytimes.  It's hard to believe that summer is right around the corner! Be sure to join us for the fun times we have planned for your little ones - not just weekly storytimes but also many other special activities and events at the Main Library and the Rakow Branch.  Weekly storytimes begin the week of June 8th. Some of our programs require pre-registration, others are drop-in.  Please check our Events Calendar http://gailbweb.gailborden.info/evanced/lib/eventcalendar.asp, give us a call, or stop by the desk in the Early Learning Center if you would like more information.  

Below you will find some of the books, rhymes, and fingerplays we are presenting this last week.

Baby Rhyme Time (For babies 0-11 months and a caregiver)

Books
Where Is Baby's Birthday Cake? - Katz
Pat-A-Cake, Pat-A-Cake - Kemp

Rhyme: Candles On The Cake
Candles on the cake (tap on baby's legs)
Candles on the cake
Blow them out (blow gently on baby)
Blow them out
Candles on the cake

Tapping on baby while singing this rhyme helps his sensory skills develop and allows him to sense the rhythm of language.

Wonderful Ones (For babies 12-23 months and a caregiver)

Books
Where To Sleep - Radzinski
Maybe, My Baby - Janovitz

Rhyme: Good Night
One fluffy quilt on my bed
Two little pillows on my head
Three teddy bears to hold tight
Four kisses from Mom for a restful night
Five hugs from Dad and off goes my light
Good night!

This sweet, little rhyme is a great way to reinforce a bedtime routine at home.  Be sure to check out some books to read when it 's time to settle down.  Make reading part of your daily routine.

Terrific Twos (For toddlers 2-3 years and a caregiver)

Books
Quiet! - Bright
Bark, George! - Feiffer
Down By The Farm - Kutner

Action Rhyme: Quietly
Quietly, quietly not a sound
I'm listening and I'm listening
As I look around
No sounds as I nod
No sounds as I clap
No sounds as I tap my hands on my lap
Loudly, loudly, stamp and clap
Loudly, loudly, stamp and clap
Loudly, loudly, stamp and clap
All that noise, well fancy that!

We are continuing our opposites theme with quiet and loud this week.  What other things in your house are quiet?  Or loud?  

1, 2, 3, Go! (For children 1, 2, and 3 years and a caregiver)

Books
One Frog Sang  - Pareteau
Hop Jump - Walsh

Action Rhyme: Gunk Gunk Went The Little Green Frog
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog one day
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog one day
And his eyes went blink, blink, blink
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog one day
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog
Gunk, gunk went the little green frog one day
And his legs went wiggle, wiggle, wiggle
And his eyes went blink, blink, blink
And his tongue went stretch, stretch, stretch
And his legs went hop, hop, hop

Can your toddler act like the frog and blink his eyes?  Can he wiggle his legs, and hop, and stretch his tongue?  What else can frogs do?   

StoryMix For 3 to 6 (For children 3-6 years without caregiver)

Books
Goodnight Baseball - Dahl
Mort The Sport - Kraus
Because I Am Your Daddy - North
Clothesline Clues To Jobs People Do - Heling

Action Rhyme: Here Is A Ball
Here is a big, round, bouncy ball
I bounce it, one, two, three
Here is a ball for throwing
I can catch it
Watch and see
Here is a ball for rolling
Please roll it back to me
Bouncing, throwing, rolling balls
Let's count them: one, two, three

This is a great rhyme for repeating outdoors!  Can your toddler do all of the things in the rhyme? How many times can he bounce a ball?  What else can he do?  















Tuesday, April 21, 2015

1000 Books Before Kindergarten - It's Finally Here!



1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading incentive program for children from birth to kindergarten.  Enjoying books with your baby, toddler or preschooler is the best way to get them ready to read on their own!  

A home life that includes positive experiences with reading and the library ensures positive attitudes for reading once in school.

Beginning April 18th, the Gail Borden Public Library is encouraging families to join this simple program.

This week in storytime your child will receive the directions for the 1000 Books Before Kindergarten program and a bird page to record the first 100 books you read together.  Remember to include stories that your child hears at library storytimes - any and all books and stories count.  If you read ONE book per night, you'll reach 1,000 books before three years have passed!  Stop by the Help Desk in the Early Learning Center for more information on this exciting program!




Storytime Programs - Spring 2015, Week Six

Welcome to our sixth week of storytime programs in Spring 2015.  We offer storytimes for babies from birth on up. Some of our programs require pre-registration, others are drop-in.  Please check our Events Calendar http://gailbweb.gailborden.info/evanced/lib/eventcalendar.asp, give us a call, or stop by the desk in the Early Learning Center if you would like more information. We hope you are able to join us and share in the fun!  Below you will find some of the books, rhymes, and fingerplays we are presenting this week.

Baby Rhyme Time (For babies 0-11 months and a caregiver)

Books
Baby Animals - Greening
Everywhere a Moo, Moo - Rookie Toddler

Rhyme: Clippity, Clippity, Clop
Clippity, clippity, clop
The horses go clip, clop
They gallop and gallop
They start and they stop
Clippity, clippity, clop

According to Baby Storytime Magic by MacMillan & Kirker. pretending to be animals or imitating their movements helps your child's physical development.   


Wonderful Ones (For babies 12-23 months and a caregiver)

Books
I'm a Little Teapot - Kemp
Jack and Jill - Woodruff

Rhyme: The Itsy Bitsy Spider
The itsy bitsy spider
Climbed up the waterspout
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
Out came the sun
And dried up all the rain
So the itsy bitsy spider
Climbed up the spout again!

In her book, Reading Magic, acclaimed author, Mem Fox states that "Experts in literacy and child development have discovered that if children know eight nursery rhymes by heart by the time they're four years old, they're usually among the best readers by the time they're eight."  Nursery rhymes give children great opportunities to not only develop their vocabulary, but also build memory and comprehension.

Terrific Twos (For toddlers 2-3 years and a caregiver)

Books
Raindrop Plop - Lewison
Five Little Ducks - Ives
What Can You Do in the Rain? - Hines

Action Rhyme: This Is My Garden
This is my garden (extend hand forward, palm up)
I'll rake it with care (make raking motion on palm with 3 fingers of other hand)
And then some flower seeds, I'll plant in there (plant motion)
The sun will shine (make circle with hands)
And the rain will fall (let fingers flutter down)
And my garden will blossom (cup hands together, extend upward slowly)
And grow straight and tall

We are continuing our opposites theme with wet and dry this week.  This rhyme is a fun way of introducing your toddler to plants and what they need to grow.  During your next outdoor playtime or walk point out some of these to him - grass, trees, spring flowers, etc.  What words can you use to describe them?  Tall, short, hard, soft, green....?  

1, 2, 3, Go! (For children 1, 2, and 3 years and a caregiver)

Books
Dimity Duck - Yolen
If You're Hoppy - Sayre

Action Rhyme: Ducks on the Bus
The ducks on the bus go quack, quack, quack
Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack, quack
The ducks on the bus go quack, quack, quack
All through the town!
Ducks...flap, flap, flap
Ducks...waddle, waddle, waddle

The toddlers enjoy this rhyme with the puppets in storytime but it is also an entertaining one to repeat at home. What other animals might be riding on the bus?  Frogs?  Rabbits?  What sounds and actions might they be making?  Have fun with this one!


StoryMix For 3 to 6 (For children 3-6 years without caregiver)

Books
Who Took the Farmer's Hat? - Nodset
When the Rooster Crowed - Lillie
Snappy Little Farmyard - Steer
Is There Room On The Featherbed? - Gray


Action Rhyme: Two Mother Pigs
Two mother pigs lived in a pen
Each had five babies and that made ten
These four babies were black as night
These four babies were black and white
And all eight babies loved to play
And they rolled and rolled in the mud all day
At night, with their mother, they curled in a heap
And squealed and squealed till they went to sleep

We talked about lots of things on the farm this week in storytime.  This is such a popular theme with preschoolers.  Be sure to check out additional  materials on this topic - books, puppets, puzzles, or CD's.  Ask at the Help Desk if we can be of assistance.