Monday, September 26, 2011

Wonderful Ones: Counting Babies

In this week's Wonderful Ones we read the book Ten Tiny Babies by Karen Katz, available to check out at the Gail Borden library.  Karen Katz has written many books for parents and babies to read together, many of them with simple themes such as colors and numbers and colorful artwork to grab baby's attention.  To find more Karen Katz books, search the library catalog by the author's name.

One of the first learning concepts babies are exposed to are numbers and counting.  Counting aloud not only introduces new sounds and words, but also creates a stimulating learning environment.  The rhymes below bring together interaction between you and your baby in an engaging and positive atmosphere, with counting actions and concepts.

Five Babies Rhyme
One little baby rocking in a tree,
Two little babies splashing in the sea,
Three little babies crawling on the floor,
Four little babies banging on the door,
Five little babies playing hide-and-seek,
Keep your eyes closed tight now,
Until I say peek!

Clap, Two, Three, Four Rhyme
Clap, two, three, four.
Shake, two, three, four.
Pat, two, three, four.
Roll, two, three, four.
Push, two, three, four.
Shake your hands and clap, clap, clap
Shake your hands and fold them in your lap.


Terrific Twos: Galloping Horses

Kids love to play, especially Terrific Two Year Olds!  This week, our theme is horses.  Our selection of rhymes, songs and stories encourages active play and thoughtful fun for your little pony.  Children will also learn through repetition and consonance different sounds, syllables and words.   Repetition of letters helps children understand word construction and meaning based on sound.

To become skilled readers, children need rich language and broad vocabulary to understand messages conveyed in print.  Word knowledge can be developed through exposure to new words, such as 'gallop' or 'meadow', and also new experiences, such as pretending to ride a horse when playing. 
 
Giddy-Yup Horsie Rhyme
Horsie, horsie, please don’t stop
Let your feet go clippity clop.
Your tail goes swish and you say neigh,
Giddy-yup, giddy-yup, you gallop away.

Horsie, horsie, please don’t stop
Let your feet go clippity clop.
Your tail goes swish and you say neigh,
Giddy-yup, giddy-yup, you gallop away.


Five Little Ponies
Five little ponies all dapple gray,
Down in the meadow not far away.
The first one said, “come on, let’s run”
The second one said, “oh, that’s not fun”
The third one said, “I’m going to neigh”
The fourth one said, “I’d like some hay”
The fifth on said, “I want a treat”
So the five little ponies trotted off to eat.

Ride 'em Cowboy by Stefan Czernicki
There's more to life on the range than just ridin' and ropin', find out for yourselves.
Check catalog availability

Clip Clop by Smee
When Mr. Horse gives a ride to his friends, Cat, Dog, Pig, and Duck, they urge him to go faster and faster.
Check catalog availability

For more clippity-clop fun, try these stories available from the library:

Appaloosa Zebra by Jessie Haas
Moving through the alphabet, a girl ponders the many different kinds of horses she will have when she gets older, from Appaloosa to zebra.
Check catalog availability

Are You a Horse? by Andy Rash
When Roy gets a saddle for his birthday, he goes in search of a horse.
Check catalog availability


Giddy-Up! Let's Ride by Flora McDonnell
Describes ways people ride horses and other animals, such as the show jumper on her trrrit-trrrotting horse, the raja on his rumpetta-trumpping elephant, and the nomad on his lolloppy-plodding camel. 
Check catalog availability

Story Mix for Three to Six: Playtime!

Children love to move their feet especially by active play!  This week's Story Mix offers ideas for children to embrace playtime!  The interactive foot movements in the rhymes below help children to think symbolically by connecting the motions with the words.  As children hear the spoken words, they begin to understand the meaning of the word through the playful movements.  Hopping, stamping and marching to rhythms allows children to hear syllables and also improves motor skills.   Introducing new words and sounds, together with the play, helps children learn new vocabulary and enhances comprehension. 


Helping's Fun Song
When I come in from outdoor play
I take my shoes off right away
I set them by the door just so
Then off my hat and jacket go
I hang them up when I am through
And put away the toys I’ve used
I’m a helper, don’t you see?
Helping’s fun, as fun can be

My Two Feet Rhyme
Watch my feet, they’re coming to play
My two feet are hopping today
Watch my feet, they’re coming to play
My two feet are tiptoeing today
Watch my feet, they’re coming to play
My two feet are stamping today
Watch my feet, they’re coming to play
My two feet are marching today
Watch my feet, they’re coming to play
My two feet are sitting today

For more playtime themed fun, check out these stories we read at this week's class:

Chicken Chickens by Valeri Gorbachev
On their first visit to a playground, two little chickens are afraid to play until a beaver helps them go down the slide.
Check catalog availability 

What Shall We Do When We All Go Out? by Shari Halpern
Words and illustrations depict the activities of the day as children go out to play.
Check catalog availability

The Line Up Book by Marisabina Russo
Sam lines up blocks, books, boots, cars, and other objects, all the way from his room to his mother in the kitchen.
Check catalog availability

1, 2, 3, GO! Birthday Bonanza!

Does your child celebrate a fall birthday?  Everyone loves a birthday party!  This week in 1, 2, 3 Go we are singing songs and playing games full of birthday fun!

Our game, Five Candles on a Birthday Cake is an interactive game that encourages new words, numbers and counting.  Children love to guess just how many candles will come next.  By using such a game, your child will also learn vocabulary and comprehension.  As children listen and see the spoken words, they begin to understand how a story works and how words and sentences are put together.

Five Candles on a Birthday Cake
Five candles on a birthday cake
Five, and not one more.
You may blow one candle out,
And that leaves four!

Four candles on a birthday cake
There for all to see.
You may blow one candle out,
And that makes three!

Three candles on a birthday cake
Standing straight and true.
You may blow one candle out,
And that leaves two!

Two candles on a birthday cake
Helping us have fun.
You may blow one candle out,
And that leaves one!

One candle on a birthday cake
We know its task is done.
You may blow this candle out,
And that leaves none!


For more interactive birthday stories to read together, try these two books from our program today:

Benny Bakes a Cake by Eve Rice
When the dog eats Benny's birthday cake, Daddy comes to the rescue.
Check catalog availability

Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake by Moira Kemp
Presents the popular nursery rhyme with colorful illustrations and detailed finger play activities for each line of the rhyme.
Check catalog availability

Looking for more birthday books?  Here are several more to devour like birthday cake:

One, Two, Buckle My Shoe by Jane Cabrera
Four chicks have fun hiding while Rabbit and Mommy Hen prepare a party for the little pigs' birthday.
Check catalog availability

The Birthday Pet by Ellen Javernick
Danny can have a pet for his birthday and he knows exactly what he wants, but the other members of his family think differently.
Check catalog availability

A Birthday for Cow by Jan Thomas
Despite the objections of Pig and Mouse, Duck insists on adding a special ingredient to the cake they are making to celebrate Cow's birthday.
Check catalog availability

I Want Two Birthdays by Tony Ross
A little princess decides that two birthdays would be better than one, and three better than two, until every day becomes her birthday, but she soon realizes that the more birthdays she has, the less special they are.
Check catalog availability

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Story Mix for Three to Six: Lunchtime Laughter

This week in Story Mix, our theme was lunchtime! Below are rhymes and stories we shared at this week's class.  Talking and sharing lunch with your child is a great way to start a conversation.  What does your child like to eat?  Has your family ever been on a picnic?  Is there anything you remember about lunchtime you can share with your child, like your favorite lunch box or snack?   Talking about food and the different mealtimes of the day, such as lunchtime, can help introduce new words to your child. 

To become skilled readers, children need rich language and broad vocabulary to understand messages conveyed in print.  Word knowledge can be developed through exposure to new words, such as 'lunchbox' or 'munch', and also new experiences, such as having a picnic.

Try these rhymes for lunchtime laughter that your 3-6 year old is sure to enjoy.  For even more fun, share them over a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Picnic Basket Rhyme
A-tisket A-tasket
Let’s pack a picnic basket
We’ll fill it up with food to munch
What should be in our lunch?

Little Mouse Rhyme  
(Sung to the tune of "Where is Thumbkin?")
Are you hungry?  Are you hungry?
Little Mouse, Little Mouse
It is time for lunch, It is time for lunch
Eat right now, Eat right now

Counting Baby Mice Rhyme
Where are the baby mice?
Squeak squeak squeak
I cannot see them
Peek peek peek
Here they come out of their hole in the wall
1,2,3,4,5, That’s all!


If you're hungry for more lunchtime laughter, check out these books we read at Story Mix.

Gladys Goes Out to Lunch by Derek Anderson
Gladys the gorilla is tired of eating nothing but bananas, until the day she smells something wonderful that lures her from the zoo in search of a new treat. 
Check catalog availability

I Need a Lunch Box by Jeannette Caines
A little boy yearns for a lunch box, even though he hasn't started school yet. 
Check catalog availability

Worms for Lunch by Leonid Gore
Easy-to-read text and die-cut illustrations allow various creatures to reveal what they like to eat. 
Check catalog availability



Monday, September 19, 2011

Terrific Twos: Toe Tapping Fun

It's our third week of toe tapping fun at the Terrific Twos fall program and we have several new rhymes and books to share. Children love to move their feet by dancing, hopping, tapping and running.  The interactive foot movements in the rhyme below help children to think symbolically by connecting the motions with the words.  Clapping, tapping and bouncing to rhythms allows children to also hear syllables and improves motor skills.

My Silly Feet Rhyme
Have you seen my silly feet, (wiggle feet)
Walking down the silly street? (pretend to walk around)
Sometimes fast, sometimes slow, (walk fast, then slow)
Sometimes high, sometimes low. (walk high, walk low)

Come and walk along with me, (walk with each other)
Walk just like my feet you see. (walk like you see your child walking)
First we’ll glide on skates, then stop, (pretend to glide on skates, then stop)
Then we’ll spin and hop, hop, hop.  (spin and hop)


At the beginning of each Terrific Twos program, we sing the song called, "Sing it, Say it, Stamp it, Sway it" by Peter and Ellen Allard.  This music CD is available to check out at the library.  Play the CD in your car so you and your child can sing along while driving.  Or play the CD at home for some toe tapping fun.  For additional resources from Peter and Ellen Allard, visit their website.  

Check catalog availability of "Sing it, Say it, Stamp it, Sway it."

Sing it, Say it, Stamp it, Sway it
Words and Music: Peter and Ellen Allard

Fingers wiggling, fingers wiggling, wiggling 1-2-3
Fingers wiggling, wiggling 'til they stop.

Knees bending, knees bending, bending 1-2-3
Knees bending, wiggling 'til they stop.

Legs marching, legs marching, marching 1-2-3
Legs marching, marching 'til they stop. 

Repeat the song using other motions:
Arms swaying...
Eyes blinking...
Shoulders shrugging...
Bodies moving...



In addition to activities and rhymes, have fun reading these two books with your Terrific Two Year Old! For more books about shoes and feet, check out this Ready Set Read Terrific Twos post.

Which Shoes Would You Chose by Betsy Rosenthal
Check catalog availability

What Shall We Do When We All Go Out? by Shari Halpern
Check catalog availability

Wonderful Ones: Clap, Tap, Bend, Bounce


It's our third week of Wonderful Ones this fall, and we have stories and rhymes to keep your baby in motion.  Using gentle movements such as clapping hands, bending knees and bouncing, babies learn how their bodies move.  The stories are full of fun ways to interact with your baby such as playing pat-a-cake and peek-a-boo.  The combined movements and language helps babies hear and learn individual words and sounds for learning speech.  Clapping, tapping and bouncing to rhythms allows babies to hear syllables and also improves motor skills.  

Books to Read Together:

I Hear by Rachel Isadora
A baby responds to all the familiar things she hears.
Check catalog availability

Peek-a-Boo, You! by Roberta Grobel Intrater
This is a cleverly designed large format board book combining almost life-size photos of baby faces and lift up flaps that tell a story about babies and the things they do.
Check catalog availability


Clap, Tap, Bend Rhyme
I take my little hands and go clap, clap, clap
I take my little hands and go clap, clap, clap
Clap, clap, all day long.
I take my little feet and go tap, tap, tap
I take my little feet and go tap, tap, tap
Tap, tap, all day long.
I take my little knees and go bend, bend, bend
I take my little knees and go bend, bend, bend
Bend, bend all day long.

Bounce Me Rhyme
Bounce me, bounce me,
On your knee.
Bounce me, bounce me,
Pretty please.
Bounce me, bounce me,
Here and there,
Bounce me, bounce me,
Everywhere.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Terrific Twos: Fancy Feet


The second week of the Terrific Twos fall program continues with our fun and fancy feet and shoes theme!  Using a combination of props, puppets, stories, rhymes and music, children are invited to participate in interactive motions and lively activities.  Different kinds of playtime help children learn about language.   Playing also helps children understand that written words stand for real objects and experiences.  The more language experiences children have, the more words they learn.

Below are two rhymes two year old children will love to tap their feet to!  The first rhyme, "Here We Go", is sung at the beginning of each Terrific Two program. 

Here We Go Rhyme
Here we go up, up, up.  (hands up in the air)
Here we go down, down, down.  (hands back down to your side)
Here we go forward.  (take one step forward)
Here we go backward.  (take one step backward)
Here we go round and round and round. (turn once around)
Sit down!

Here we go up, up, up.  (hands up in the air)
Here we go down, down, down.  (hands back down to your side)
Here we go forward.  (take one step forward)
Here we go backward.  (take one step backward)
Here we go round and round and round. (turn once around)
Sit down!


Hickory Dickory Dock Rhyme
Hickory Dickory Dock
Let’s put on our socks
We’ll walk around, not making a sound
When we wear our socks.

Hickory Dickory Dock
Let’s put on our socks
We’ll walk around, not making a sound
When we wear our socks.



In addition to these two rhymes, we read several books at this week's Terrific Twos program.  These books are about shoes, because sometimes two year olds want fancier shoes than plain old sneakers!  For additional books about shoes and feet, check out last week's Ready Set Read Terrific Twos post.

Whose Shoes? by Anna Grossnickle Hines
Check catalog availability

New Shoes, Red Shoes by Susan Rollings
Check catalog availability

Monday, September 12, 2011

Story Mix for Three to Six: School is Cool!

September is upon us at the Gail Borden Public Library!  The temperature outside is cooling down and children are going back to school.  Perhaps your child attending this week's Story Mix just started preschool or kindergarten this year!  In the second week of the fall program, we are going to read the book, The Little School Bus by Carol Roth, a story about an assortment of animals who ride the bus to and from school.  We will also read the book, We Love School by Marilyn Janovitz, which uses simple rhymes and illustrations to describe to a young kitten what it's like going to school.    

Reading together incorporates all those great new ideas your child is learning in preschool or kindergarten by using rhyming, repetition, story structure and critical thinking.  Stories and songs in rhyme encourage new vocabulary, listening and oral language skills.

Sharing songs and stories together also encourages talking and conversation between you and your child.  For example, talk about what he or she learned in school that day asking questions about favorite songs and playtime activities. You can even have your child re-tell the story or song to you, using his or her own creative flair to help make learning fun!

Another idea would be to have your child draw a picture of their favorite schooltime snack or toy.  Helping your child write captions for the picture connects the spoken words to the ideas, and creates a visual representation of your child's imagination to share.

Below is a "school" themed song and rhyme we performed at the Story Mix program this week:

The Wheels on the Bus Song
The wheels on the bus go round and round, round and round, round and round
The wheels on the bus go round and round all through the town.

Repeat the song using different parts of and people on the bus: 
The children on the bus go up and down, up and down, up and down...
The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep beep...
The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish, swish, swish, swish, swish, swish, swish...


Ready for School Rhyme
This little girl is going to bed
Down on the pillow she lays her head
She covers herself with the blankets so tight
And this is the way she sleeps all night
Morning comes and she opens her eyes
Throws back the covers and up she flies
Soon she is up and dressed for the day
Ready for school and ready for play

Check catalog availability of The Little School Bus by Carol Roth

Check catalog availability of We Love School by Marilyn Janovitz

Wonderful Ones: Cuddly Teddy Bears

This week in Wonderful Ones, we explored the cuddly world of teddy bears!  Just like teddy bears, your babies are gentle, soft and cuddly!  Through the songs and rhymes, you and your baby will use gentle movements to learn about the space around them, such as, reaching for the sky or patting their knee.  Through the stories you read together, interact with your baby by playing the actions described in the book, such as, touching your nose.  Using songs, rhymes and books, you are helping to introduce new words and sounds to your child, which helps him or her develop a bigger vocabulary.

Teddy Bear Books to Read Together:
Everybody Has a Teddy by Virginia Kroll
A child describes teddy bears owned by other children, from Joshy's giant grizzly to the floppy bear Poppy's grandmother made from socks.
Check catalog availability


That's Not My Teddy by Fiona Watt

Young readers may touch various surfaces on teddy bears while looking for the right one.
 Check catalog availability
 

Teddy Bears, Teddy Bears by William B. Winburn
Teddy bears can do many things, from touching their nose and toes to touching the sky and waving goodbye.
Check catalog availability


Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear Rhyme:
Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn around
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the ground
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch your shoe
Teddy bear, teddy bear, that will do
Teddy bear, teddy bear, reach for the sky
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch one eye
Teddy bear, teddy bear, pat your knees
Teddy bear, teddy bear, sit down please
Teddy bear, teddy bear, pat the ground
Teddy bear, teddy bear, sit down without a sound.



In addition to the Teddy Bear themed books and rhyme, we sang the song called, "Put Your Hands in the Air" by Hap Palmer.  This music CD is available to check out at the library.  Play the CD in your car so you and your baby can sing along while driving.  Or play the CD at home while baby is taking a bath and splash along with the music.  For additional resources from Hap Palmer, visit his website.  

Check catalog availability of "Hap Palmer sings classic nursery rhymes"

Put Your Hands In The Air
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Activity:
Move with the rhythm of the music as you follow the directions in this song.

Lyrics:
Put your hands up in the air
Put your hands down on your nose
Put your hands up in the air
Now bend down and touch your toes
Everybody turn around
Now let's all jump up and down

Put your right hand in the air
Put your right hand on your lips
Put your left hand in the air
Now put both hands on your hips
Everybody turn around
Now let's all jump up and down

Tip toe quietly to your seat
Don't let anyone hear your feet
Put your hands down in your lap
Bow your head and take a nap

Instrumental:
What other body parts could you put up in the air? Can you put your foot in the air? Can you put your elbow in the air? Lower your elbow and find and contact it with a different part of your body.  Sing this song again using your ideas. For example:

Put your elbow in the air
Put your elbow on your knee
Put you thumbs up in the air
Bring them down and touch your heels

1, 2, 3, GO! Color and Spider Stories

If you've been to our 1, 2, 3, Go! program, then you are familiar with the energetic stories, rhymes and musical activities enjoyed each week by children ages 1 - 3.  The stories and rhymes below introduce concepts such as colors and directions through repetition and rhyming.  The actions and movements used help children develop motorskills as they clap and jump, as well as, make connections with concepts.


If Your Clothes Have Any...
If your clothes have any red - Put your finger on your head!
If your clothes have any blue - Put your finger on your shoe!
If your clothes have any green - Wave your hand so that you're seen!
If your clothes have any yellow - Smile like a happy fellow!
If your clothes have any brown - Turn your smile into a frown!
If your clothes have any pink - Give a great big wink!
If your clothes have any white - Give a hug with all your might!

For fun stories about colors, try these:

Cat's Colors by Jane Cabrera
A cat describes ten different colors and tells which one is its favorite.
Check catalog availability

A Day With No Crayons by Elizabeth Rusch
A little girl discovers all sorts of artistic possibilities when she has to go a day without crayons.
Check catalog availability

A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
In order to ensure her popularity, Camilla Cream always does what is expected, until the day arrives when she no longer recognizes herself.
Check catalog availability




Two Creepy Spiders
Two creepy spiders crawling up my leg,
One named Jack, one named Meg.
Crawl away, Jack.  Crawl away, Meg.
Come back, Jack.  Come back meg.

Little Miss Muffet
Little Miss Muffet,
Sat on her tuffet,
Eating her curds and whey.
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.

Little Miss Muffet,
Sat on her tuffet,
Eating her curds and whey.
Along came a spider,
Who sat down above her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.

Repeat the poem using other positional words such as "in front" or "behind."


To accompany the spider themed poems and fingerplays, check out these books!

The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle
The farm animals try to divert a busy little spider from spinning her web, but she persists and produces a thing of both beauty and usefulness.
Check catalog availability


Itsy Bitsy Spider by Keith Chapman
The wind blows Itsy Bitsy Spider to a day of adventure among various farm animals.
Check catalog availability

The Itsy Bitsy Spider by Sharon Lane Holm
This version of the popular children's rhyme has colorful illustrations and fingerplay activities for each line of the rhyme.
Check catalog availability


Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Story Mix for Three to Six: Cock-a-Doodle Cluck Cluck!

Story Mix is the weekly program for kids ages 3 - 6 and introduces stories, songs, activity and fun! In the first week of the fall program, we are going to read the book, Cock-A-Doodle Quack Quack! by Ivor Baddiel and Sophie Jubb.  Shared reading is valuable because your child has your full attention, and you are enjoying the experience together.   Shared reading with your child develops vocabulary, comprehension and encourages imaginative thinking.

Cock-A-Doodle Quack Quack! is a humorous tale about a baby rooster who is trying to wake up the other animals on the farm, but not having any luck. By carefully listening to the other roosters, the baby rooster learns how to call out in the morning and wake up the pigs and cows!

Kids will love making the animal noises along with the baby rooster and learn to understand and differentiate the variety of farm animals. When reading together, make observations and involve your child by asking questions about the story.

Check catalog availability for the book Cock-A-Doodle Quack Quack! by Ivor Baddiel and Sophie Jubb.

To accompany this book, you and your child can sing the "Little Chicken" song.  You can add playful elements with movement and action when singing the song together.  Singing also helps children remember things for a longer time and hear the smaller sounds in words.


Little Chicken Rhyme
Said the first little chicken
With a queer little squirm
Oh, I wish I could find
A fat little worm

Said the second little chicken
With an odd little shrug
Oh, I wish I could find
A fat little bug

Said the third little chicken
With a small sigh of grief
Oh, I wish I could find
A green little leaf

Said the fourth little chicken
With a sharp little squeal
Oh, I wish I could find
Some nice yellow meal

Said the fifth little chicken
With a faint little moan
Oh, I wish I could find
A wee gravel stone

Now see here, said their mother
From the green garden path
If you want any breakfast
Just come here and scratch.

Terrific Twos: Feet are Fantastic!

Do you have a Terrific Two-Year Old?  Then you and your child have probably enjoyed our weekly program especially for boys and girls aged 24-36 months.  The first week of the Fall program introduced several concepts to two-year olds such as hands, feet and the actions of each of these body parts.  With interactive motions children will begin to think symbolically and develop oral language skills.  Through such playtime, children then practice putting thoughts into words.  Rhythmic language through the song and books listed below also engage your child to learn about feet and their motions.


My Two Feet Rhyme
(Sung to the tune of 'Mary had a Little Lamb')
This is what my feet can do, feet can do, feet can do.
This is what my feet can do...
Can you do it too?

Let your feet go hop, hop, hop,
Hop, hop, hop, hop, hop, hop.
Let your feet go hop, hop, hop...
All around the room.

This is what my feet can do, feet can do, feet can do.
This is what my feet can do...
Can you do it too?

Let your feet go march, march, march,
March, march, march, march, march, march.
Let your feet go march, march, march...
All around the room.

This is what my feet can do, feet can do, feet can do.
This is what my feet can do...
Can you do it too?

Let your feet go tip-toeing, tip-toeing, tip-toeing,
Let your feet go tip-toeing, tip-toeing, tip-toeing...
All around the room.

Now your feet can sit right down, sit right down, sit right down.
Now your feet can sit right down, very quietly.



The story read in this week's Terrific Twos program was My Two Hands, My Two Feet by Rick Walton
In separate rhyming stories, two girls describe how they use their hands and feet.
Check catalog availability

For more fun books about feet to read together, try one of these: 

Two Shoes, Blue Shoes, New Shoes by Sally Fitz-Gibbon
A brand new pair of shoes can hop and skip to school better than anything. And nobody is as proud of her shiny footwear as this little girl, who bounces and dances her way through an imaginative adventure that only her two, new, blue shoes can discover.
Check catalog availability 

Who Has These Feet? by Laura Hulbert
In a lively guessing game format, find out why the feet of tree frogs, and those of eight other animals, are perfectly adapted to their habitats.
Check catalog availability

Ooh La La Polka Dot Boots by Ellen Olson-Brown
Illustrations and brief rhyming text sing the praises of polka dot boots, which add panache to any outfit.
Check catalog availability

Hello Toes! Hello Feet! by Ann Whitford Paul
A girl takes delight in all the things she and her feet do throughout the day.
Check catalog availability

Hooray for Feet! by Susan Pearson
Hooray for Feet! celebrates the many ways our feet are always part of the action: holding us up, hurrying us along, stopping us short, taking us wherever we want to go.
Check catalog availability

Harris Finds His Feet by Catherine Raynor
Harris, a very small hare with very big feet, has an elderly Grandad who teaches him the many uses of big, strong feet and other important life lessons.
Check catalog availability

I Feel a Foot! by Maranke Rinck & Martijn van der Linden
Five animal friends, awakened by a strange noise, discover a creature in the dark that seems to be a giant-sized version of each of them.
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One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab: a counting by feet book by April Pulley Sayre and Jeff Sayre
A counting book featuring animals with different numbers of feet.
Check catalog availability

Baby Shoes by Dashka Slater
After taking a walk with his mother, Baby's new white shoes with the blue stripe are covered with a variety of colors.
Check catalog availability

Right and Lefty: a tale of two feet by Rachel Vail
Even though Lefty and Righty like different things, they find they must learn to get along together without tripping over each other.

Wonderful Ones Songs & Rhymes to Sing Together

At the library, you may have brought your youngest children to the Wonderful Ones program.  This very popular program is specifically designed for babies 9 - 23 months and offers 15 minutes of stories, singing, and fingerplays along with an additional 15 minutes of playtime.  From the time they are infants, children learn language and other important skills that will help them learn to read.

At each session of Wonderful Ones, there is an opening and closing song and rhyme sung when we say hello and goodbye.  Songs are a fun activity you can do at home, at the park, or even in the car.  Clapping along helps children improve their motor skills.

Opening Song: Here We are Together
Here we are together, together, together
Yes, here we are together all here on the floor.
There's Josh and Maggie and Emma and Sam
There's parents and children and Paula and Jack
Yes, here we are together all here on the floor.

Opening Action Rhyme: The Wiggle Song
(Sung to the tune of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow")
My hands are starting to wiggle,
My hands are starting to wiggle,
My hands are starting to wiggle,
Around and around and around.

My feet are starting to wiggle,
My feet are starting to wiggle,
My feet are starting to wiggle,
Now all of me is a wiggle!

Closing Rhyme: Wave Goodbye
Wave high, wave low,
I think it's time we gotta go!
Wave your elbows, wave your toes,
Wave your tongue and wave your nose.
Wave your ears and wave your eyes,
Wave your hands and say goodbye.